New York Times story by Bina Shah:

Pakistan isn’t usually considered one of the world’s information technology powerhouses; its share of global I.T. sales is only $2.8 billion, of which $1.6 billion represents tech and I.T. services and software exported abroad. This is a tiny percentage of the expected $3.2 trillion global market for 2015,and is dwarfed by India’s $100 billion worth of software exports per year.

Yet Pakistan’s I.T. sector is carving a niche for itself as a favored place to go for freelance I.T. programmers, software coders and app designers. There are now 1,500 registered I.T. companies in Pakistan, and 10,000 I.T. grads enter the market every year. Energetic members of the middle class educated in Pakistan’s top universities, they have honed their skills at the many hackathons, start-up fairs and expos, digital summits and entrepreneurial events at campuses, software houses and I.T. associations across the country.

Next comes showcasing their skills to a global market in order to grow businesses. So Pakistani freelance programmers flock to global freelance hiring sites such as Upwork, or fiverr.com, where digital employers in the United States, Australia or Britain bid to hire programmers for small software and app projects. On these platforms, hiring someone from Pakistan becomes as easy as hiring someone from Ireland or India, because traditional concerns about security, corruption and invasive bureaucracy in Pakistan do not apply.

Read the whole NYTimes story here.

New York Times story by Bina Shah:

Pakistan isn’t usually considered one of the world’s information technology powerhouses; its share of global I.T. sales is only $2.8 billion, of which $1.6 billion represents tech and I.T. services and software exported abroad. This is a tiny percentage of the expected $3.2 trillion global market for 2015,and is dwarfed by India’s $100 billion worth of software exports per year.

Yet Pakistan’s I.T. sector is carving a niche for itself as a favored place to go for freelance I.T. programmers, software coders and app designers. There are now 1,500 registered I.T. companies in Pakistan, and 10,000 I.T. grads enter the market every year. Energetic members of the middle class educated in Pakistan’s top universities, they have honed their skills at the many hackathons, start-up fairs and expos, digital summits and entrepreneurial events at campuses, software houses and I.T. associations across the country.

Next comes showcasing their skills to a global market in order to grow businesses. So Pakistani freelance programmers flock to global freelance hiring sites such as Upwork, or fiverr.com, where digital employers in the United States, Australia or Britain bid to hire programmers for small software and app projects. On these platforms, hiring someone from Pakistan becomes as easy as hiring someone from Ireland or India, because traditional concerns about security, corruption and invasive bureaucracy in Pakistan do not apply.

Read the whole NYTimes story here.